‘Jen, should I eat my vegetables raw or cooked?’ In this episode, Jen shares ways you can cook your vegetables to get the best nutrition.

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SHOWNOTES

The debate between consuming raw versus cooked vegetables is nuanced, especially in light of research on how preparation methods affect nutrient levels. A study highlighted in The British Journal of Nutrition revealed that individuals adhering to a raw food diet maintained adequate vitamin A levels and had elevated beta-carotene levels, a nutrient abundant in dark green and yellow fruits and vegetables. However, their levels of lycopene, an antioxidant predominantly found in tomatoes and certain red or pink fruits, were lower.

Lycopene has been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease in various studies, including those from Harvard Medical School. It’s suggested that lycopene might be a more effective antioxidant than vitamin C, according to Rui Hai Liu, a food science expert at Cornell University. Liu’s research, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, demonstrated that cooking tomatoes can increase their lycopene content by 35 percent after heating for 30 minutes at 88 degrees Celsius (190.4 degrees Fahrenheit). However, this process also reduces their vitamin C content, highlighting a trade-off between enhancing certain nutrients while diminishing others.

Cooking vegetables can break down cell walls, making nutrients more accessible, but overcooking can lead to the loss of water-soluble vitamins and minerals through evaporation.

Regarding the consumption of vegetable skins, they are known to be nutrient-dense, offering a rich source of fibre, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Integrating the skin with the flesh can significantly enhance your nutrient intake, especially since peeling vegetables can result in the loss of up to one-third of their fibre content. This fibre is crucial not just for digestion but also for nourishing gut bacteria, which produce beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs play essential roles in maintaining gut health, regulating blood pressure, and supporting immune function and anti-inflammatory responses.

For instance, potato skins contain valuable fibre and nutrients such as vitamins B and C, potassium, calcium, and iron. The cooking method can influence the glycemic index (GI) of sweet potatoes, with boiling retaining moisture and keeping them low GI, suitable for meals around exercise, whereas baking concentrates their starches, raising their GI. Pumpkin skins are another fibre-rich option, adding to the vegetable’s low-calorie, high-water content, and nutritional profile, including beta-carotene and vitamin E.

Kiwi skins significantly boost the intake of folate and vitamin E compared to consuming the flesh alone, demonstrating the benefits of eating the peel where possible.

In summary, the choice between eating raw or cooked vegetables and whether to include the skin depends on the specific nutrients you aim to maximize and the overall dietary balance. Adjusting cooking methods and incorporating peels when feasible can optimize nutrient intake and contribute to a healthier diet.

HEALTHY LIFE HACKS

The Healthy Life Hacks I want to share with you today are:

  1. Share with someone who would benefit.
Best ways to cook different vegetables for best nutrition

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