Did you know that women over 50 need to have 100 grams of protein a day? In this episode, Jen talks about why it’s essential and what foods you can source it from.

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SHOWNOTES

Protein is an essential macronutrient that plays a crucial role in maintaining overall health and well-being. 

Protein is the building block of muscles, and consuming an adequate amount is vital for women who engage in physical activities or exercise regularly. 

By consuming around 100 grams of protein daily, women can support muscle development, repair damaged tissues, and protect themselves against muscle loss, particularly as they age.

A high-protein diet can be beneficial for women who are aiming to manage their weight. 

Protein has a higher thermic effect compared to fats and carbohydrates, meaning that it requires more energy to digest. Consequently, consuming protein-rich foods can help boost metabolism, reduce appetite, and increase feelings of fullness, thereby supporting weight loss or weight maintenance goals.

Protein is involved in the production and regulation of hormones, which are essential for various bodily functions. 

Adequate protein intake supports the synthesis of hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and insulin.

Protein is vital for healthy hair, skin, and nails. Consuming around 100 grams of protein each day ensures an adequate supply of amino acids that promote collagen synthesis, improve skin elasticity, and strengthen hair and nails. 

This can result in healthier and more vibrant hair, youthful-looking skin, and stronger nails.

  1. Fish – half a salmon fillet (124 g) provides 30.5 g of protein, while a cod fillet (180 g) provides 41 g
  2. Shellfish – A 3-ounce (85-g) serving of cooked clams provides 21.8 g of protein, while the same serving of shrimp/prawns provides 20.4 g of protein
  3. Skinless, white-meat poultry –  One half of a chicken breast (86 g) provides 26.7 g of protein
  4. Lean beef – A 3-ounce (85-g) serving of lean beef provides 24.6 g
  5. Cottage Cheese – One cup (226 g) of cottage cheese provides 28 g 
  6. Greek Yoghurt – One 7-ounce (200-g) container provides 19.9 g
  7. Eggs. One large egg (50 g) provides 6.3 g of protein
  8. Peanut Butter – A 1-ounce (28.35-g) serving of peanuts provides 7.31 g of protein, while a 2-tablespoon (32-g) serving of smooth peanut butter provides 7.2 g
  9. Pumpkin Seeds – A 1/4 cup (29.5 g) of pumpkin seeds provides 8.8 g
  10. Lentils: 18 grams of protein per cup
  11. Chickpeas: 15 grams of protein per cup
  12. Black beans: 15 grams of protein per cup
  13. Tofu: 20 grams of protein per 1/2 cup
  14. Edamame: 17 grams of protein per cup (shelled)
  15. Hemp seeds: 10 grams of protein per 3 tablespoons
  16. Quinoa: 8 grams of protein per cup (cooked)
  17. Chia seeds: 6 grams of protein per 2 tablespoons
  18. Spinach: 5 grams of protein per cup (cooked)
  19. Almonds: 6 grams of protein per 1/4 cup, pistachios, 5.73 g per 1-ounce (28.35 g), cashews, which contain 4.34 g of protein per 1-ounce (28.35-g) 

HEALTHY LIFE HACKS

The Healthy Life Hacks I want to share with you today are:

  1. Share this podcast episode with those you feel may benefit.
Why women over 50 need over 100 grams of protein a day

Did you enjoy the podcast today? Please let me know by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts. Every month I draw one lucky reviewer to have a free one-hour consultation with me. Also, remember to subscribe wherever you’re tuning in from so that you always catch the next episode.

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